Student ID as Voter ID

Student ID as Voter ID STUDENT ID AS VOTER ID Students face unique barriers to voting. One such barrier is having the necessary identification to cast a ballot. Voter ID laws vary state by state ranging from no voter ID requirement to strict photo ID requirements that only include certain types of ID that meet specific criteria. Some of these states accept student IDs; others do not. 30 states currently have some form of in-person voter ID law in place, but the list of acceptable IDs varies substantially from state to state. Some states have expansive lists including both photo and non-photo forms of ID, with many of these states offering an alternative procedure to presenting ID at the polls. The remaining 20 states plus the District of Columbia have no voter ID law or it is currently enjoined or not yet in force. [1] 16 of the 30 voter ID states permit voters without ID to sign a personal identification affidavit instead of presenting ID, cast a provisional ballot which will be counted if the signature matches the registration database, or otherwise authorize alternative verification of the voter’s identity. They include: Alaska, Connecticut, Delaware, Florida, Idaho, Hawaii, Louisiana, Michigan, Missouri, Montana, New Hampshire, Oklahoma, Rhode Island, South Dakota, Utah, and Washington. These sixteen states have different requirements for what information an acceptable ID must contain. Those details are recorded in the PDF chart which can be downloaded below, but we do not explore it here because the voter always has an alternative to voter ID in these 16 states. That leaves 14 “strict voter ID” states, by which...

Student Voter ID Madness: The Sweet and Not-So-Sweet of 16 Schools’ State Voter ID Laws

Campus Vote Project and Fair Elections Legal Network have caught March Madness like the rest of the country. In the spirit of the season, we took a look at the Sweet 16 teams and compared their voter ID laws and whether they accept or don’t accept student ID. CVP has more information on student ID as voter ID on our site. No. 1 Kansas vs. No. 5 Maryland While Kansas allows student voters to use public and private college and university ID cards, the Terps win this game in a blow-out because Maryland has no voter ID law. Better luck next year, Jayhawks. No. 2 Villanova vs. No. 3 Miami Pennsylvania’s voter ID law was struck down on state constitutional grounds a couple years ago. Florida will allow student ID cards at the polls and, even if you forget yours, you can still vote a provisional ballot which will be counted as long as your signature matches the one on your registration form (but if you can help it, show an ID and don’t leave your vote up to signature-matching). We award this game to Nova because no voter ID law is still better than a flexible voter ID law. Sorry, Gators; you kept it close. No. 4 Duke vs. No. 1 Oregon Oregon wins this game in double digits because it has no voter identification law and North Carolina prohibits Duke students from using their student ID cards to vote at the polls. North Carolina’s ID law has been challenged in federal court and a decision is expected soon. No. 2 Oklahoma vs. No. 3 Texas A&M Oklahoma...

Students at the Harvard Institute of Politics Conference share ideas on registering voters on campus

by Hannah Smith, CVP Field Director Last weekend Mike Burns, the Executive Director of Campus Vote Project, and I went to the “Campus Activation: Increasing Student Voting and Political Engagement” conference hosted by Harvard University’s Institute of Politics. Conferences like this are great learning experiences for Mike and I. In addition to meeting administrators from all over the country, we also heard about the wonderful work students from 28 campuses are doing to engage voters at their schools. Some examples of campus work included mayoral forums at the University of Southern California, tabling at high profile student events at Kansas State and creating a student-led coalition that has organized into a lean, mean, voter registration machine at University of Florida. On Sunday CVP was part of a panel focusing on the institutionalization of voter registration programs on campus. We, along with Sam Novey of the National Student Vote Challenge, and Vashti Selix, formerly of the Oregon Student Association and currently of the AIDS Action Committee, spoke to students about involvement with voter registration efforts and the best-practices we’ve accumulated from our work with students across the U.S. After the panelists discussed their experiences from college campuses and working with administrators, we asked students to describe what voter registration activities and efforts have worked at their schools. Mike spoke about how to work with administrators and answered lingering questions students had about voter ID laws in their state. A tremendous example of registering student voters came from the Oregon Student Association. Vashti shared how she registered 55,000 Oregon students in the most successful voter registration drive Oregon students have ever...

Getting Students Voter ID

This post was originally published by CVP on March 14, 2012 The CVP toolkit features detailed resources that student organizations, college administrators, and local election officials can use to implement reforms that will make college campuses more voter-friendly. This blog entry is the first of several that will highlight one piece of the toolkit and give examples of ways in which these reforms were implemented. “Get ID: Making Sure Students Have the ID They Need to Vote” provides strategies for helping students overcome ID requirements that might otherwise create a barrier to voting. Some states require photo ID to be presented at the polls, some allow non-photo IDs, and others require no ID, so the first step is to check with your state or local election officials to see which requirements apply. You can also contact CVP at info@campusvoteproject.org for assistance. Once you know the rules, spread the word well before Election Day so students can prepare. You can do this in a number of ways. Integrate voter ID information into the school website: The University of Wisconsin-Madison is using its student voting website to keep students informed about ongoing legal developments related to a strict photo ID requirement that was recently struck down in state court. Include information about ID requirements with voter registration cards during move-in and orientation and encourage Residence Life to distribute information through dorms and Greek houses. Send campus-wide email alerts. Institutionalize a regular feature in campus press related to voter registration and voting requirements. Set up a “Voting Help Desk” in the student union, library, bookstore, cafeteria, or other highly trafficked location on...

Apply Now to Join the CVP Student Advisory Board

Overview In 2012, the Fair Elections Legal Network (FELN) launched Campus Vote Project (CVP) to expand its work around student voting issues. CVP works with universities, community colleges, faculty, students and election officials to reduce barriers to student voting. Our goal is to help campuses institutionalize reforms that empower students with the information they need to register and vote. As part of our mission, we want to invite students who have played a role in expanding or deepening democratic engagement on their campus to apply for our Student Advisory Board. This leadership program provides opportunities for civically-minded and active students to influence Campus Vote Project, learn more about democratic engagement nationally, and develop relationships with peers, institutions, and civic leaders. Position Description The Student Advisory Board position is a volunteer position for civic-minded student leaders who want to be a part of the national democratic engagement movement. As a founding member of the Students Learn Students Vote coalition and a co-creator of the Voter Friendly Campus designation, CVP prides itself in being a leader in institutionalizing democratic engagement on college campuses. The board member position requires 15-20 hours per month. Time will be spent participating in a monthly call with CVP national staff and guest speakers, being a representative for democracy reform on your campus and in your state, and being an advocate for greater democratic engagement. They will also have an opportunity to participate in a multi-day summit with other civic leaders. Ideal Candidates will reflect the following values Passionate about civic learning and democratic engagement in higher education Care about advancing voting rights and ensuring all eligible...