Campus Vote Project Blog

The CVP Blog keeps you up-to-date on the latest election-related information and provides insight on how to best engage with students, campus administrators and election officials.

CVP Launches California Campus Projects

Today California Secretary of State Alex Padilla will visit Los Angeles Trade Technical College to kick off their initiative to discuss the importance of voter registration and the role young people can play in shaping the future through civic participation. Campus Vote Project is partnering with the LA Community College District, its nine colleges, and its faculty and students to support a program to help students register and vote in 2016 and beyond. The program will increase student awareness of the elections process and its connection to policies that affect their college community and the communities in which they live, and integrate voter registration and voter education directly into student activities. CVP will work with the District to implement tools that can help increase youth participation in voting, while fulfilling the schools’ mission to educate students about their fundamental right and responsibility as a citizen to vote.  Community colleges are uniquely positioned to provide students with a nonpartisan introduction to registration and voting. They can also impart knowledge regarding the functions of different levels of government and encourage civil discourse around important community issues. In addition to our work with the LA Community College District, CVP is also working with De Anza College, and its administrators, faculty and students to increase student voter registration and...

Your Questions Answered about CVP’s Voter Friendly Campus Designation

Good Housekeeping has their seal as a stamp of approval for good household products. Campus Vote Project and NASPA are teaming up to offer our own recognition for campuses that help students register and vote. The Voter Friendly Campus designation program is a brand new opportunity and we want to answer some basic questions to help administrators decide if they should sign up. Voter Friendly Campus designation interest forms are due May 13, 2016. Q.What is the Voter Friendly Campus designation program? A. This program helps institutions develop a plan that will coordinate administrators, faculty, and student organizations in civic and electoral engagement. After colleges and universities execute their plan to help students register and vote in the 2016 elections, campuses will be evaluated and designated as an official Voter Friendly Campus. Q. Why should my college or university sign up to be designated a Voter Friendly Campus? A. In addition to educating students, fostering civic learning is a goal of many colleges and universities. By helping students register and vote, campuses will help students be active participants in our democracy. The Voter Friendly Campus designation helps administrators develop a plan using our checklist and set clear goals so a path can be created well in advance of November. These activities can be institutionalized for the following years, keeping students engaged as they enter, and move through their time at school. Q. What happens after we are designated a Voter Friendly Campus? A. Campuses that follow through on their plan to register students and help them cast a ballot will be recognized and sent materials that can be used...

Student Voter ID Madness: The Sweet and Not-So-Sweet of 16 Schools’ State Voter ID Laws

Campus Vote Project and Fair Elections Legal Network have caught March Madness like the rest of the country. In the spirit of the season, we took a look at the Sweet 16 teams and compared their voter ID laws and whether they accept or don’t accept student ID. CVP has more information on student ID as voter ID on our site. No. 1 Kansas vs. No. 5 Maryland While Kansas allows student voters to use public and private college and university ID cards, the Terps win this game in a blow-out because Maryland has no voter ID law. Better luck next year, Jayhawks. No. 2 Villanova vs. No. 3 Miami Pennsylvania’s voter ID law was struck down on state constitutional grounds a couple years ago. Florida will allow student ID cards at the polls and, even if you forget yours, you can still vote a provisional ballot which will be counted as long as your signature matches the one on your registration form (but if you can help it, show an ID and don’t leave your vote up to signature-matching). We award this game to Nova because no voter ID law is still better than a flexible voter ID law. Sorry, Gators; you kept it close. No. 4 Duke vs. No. 1 Oregon Oregon wins this game in double digits because it has no voter identification law and North Carolina prohibits Duke students from using their student ID cards to vote at the polls. North Carolina’s ID law has been challenged in federal court and a decision is expected soon. No. 2 Oklahoma vs. No. 3 Texas A&M Oklahoma...
Coming Up: Becoming a Voter-Friendly Campus Webinar

Coming Up: Becoming a Voter-Friendly Campus Webinar

CVP is involved in an upcoming webinar on student voting and we want you to join! Below is all the information on the event, and a link to register. We hope you log on! Becoming a Voter-Friendly Campus Webinar | Wednesday, March 2nd This is the first of our ADP/TDC Engage the Election 2016 webinar series powered by icitizen. There will be 6 total webinars between now and November 2016 — all will be open to faculty, staff, students and friends. Offered in partnership with The Fair Elections Legal Network’s Campus Vote Project (CVP), this webinar will introduce participants to the Students Learn, Students Vote Checklist and seek early adopters to be part of an inaugural class of higher education institutions undertaking these efforts to foster more voter-friendly campuses. CVP will discuss promising practices from previous experiences with student electoral engagement, identify resources and materials to help campuses plan, execute, and evaluate their efforts, and create a system to enroll and support campuses in this program. We encourage you to participate in this webinar and to consider how your campus can become more voter-friendly! Speaker: Mike Burns, National Director, Campus Vote Project When: Wednesday, March 2, 2016 from 2:30 p.m. – 4 p.m. EST To RSVP click here....

As HEA Turns 50, A Reflection on Voter Registration on College Campuses

by Kristen Muthig, Communications and Policy Manager Sunday marked the 50th anniversary of the Higher Education Act (HEA). This landmark law helped improve higher education by providing federal resources to colleges and universities and offering loans and scholarships to students. Congress has repeatedly reauthorized the Act, and its policies and programs tremendously improved higher education in our country. In addition, the HEA also charges colleges and universities to distribute voter registration forms to students. Registration and voting is a strong indicator of overall student civic engagement, which many colleges and universities acknowledge as part of a well-rounded college education. Campus Vote Project and many other partner organizations have emphasized the obligation created by this section of the HEA to encourage campuses to do more to engage students in their broader campus communities by voting and participating in the elections process. Not only is it a good way for students to become active citizens, but by helping students register and understand how to access the ballot, colleges and universities can fulfill the charge set forth by the HEA. There are a variety of challenges to employing a robust campaign to engage student voters and follow the HEA requirement, but there are ways to overcome them. Challenge #1: Resources. Budgets are always tight. Taking advantage of online means like email, social media, and the college’s existing website and communications tools are a cost-effective way to deliver voting and civic engagement messages. Students are often first time voters and new to the process and may not understand the different rules, deadlines, and avenues for registering and voting. Sending reminders, links to forms,...

Understand the Ballot and Make Sure You are Prepared to Vote

by Kristen Muthig, Communications and Policy Manager CVP posted our Six Reasons to Vote last week highlighting some reasons students in particular should be sure to cast a ballot tomorrow, November 3. This Election Day many states and cities have local issues and candidates on the ballot. They may not have as much media buzz and excitement as a presidential campaign, but that doesn’t make them any less important. The direct impact local politics has on everyday life is a significant reason to cast a ballot tomorrow. In reality, the people who will sit on school boards and city council, or as mayor and state representative will make more decisions that directly, and at times immediately, impact the cities or towns we live in than state or nationwide officials will. Many issues like funding for higher education, job training, business development, voting rules, and the condition of parks, libraries, roads, and bridges we all use are in the purview of local officials. Despite their influence on daily life, a lack of information about the offices, the issues, and even how to cast a ballot can deter young people from voting in these crucial elections. Depending on the state and community there can be different sources for information on the candidates and issues. However, groups like the League of Women Voters regional offices often have nonpartisan voting guides (you can find them online at www.Vote411.org), secretaries of state may explain what the issues are like this one in Ohio, and local newspapers often have information on what you’ll see on the ballot. Before casting an informed ballot, voters must also...