Congratulations VFC Campuses with ALL IN Challenge Awards

The Voter Friendly Campus designation program and ALL IN Campus Democracy Challenge are two efforts to encourage colleges and universities to foster environments of civic and democratic engagement. By encouraging students to be active participants in elections and our democracy these campuses are empowering generations of engaged citizens. Many of the schools who participated and earned the Voter Friendly Campus designation this year were also recognized for their achievements in the ALL IN Challenge Awards. Below are the Voter Friendly Campuses and the various ALL IN Challenge Awards they received. Congratulations to all our campuses and to the many other campuses that did so much to encourage student participation in elections.  ...

Join the CVP Team in Ohio and Michigan

We are excited to announce that Campus Vote Project is hiring two full-time state coordinator positions! If you are interested in joining our team and working with campuses in Ohio or Michigan please consider applying for these new opportunities. Ohio Coordinator Michigan...

Why Getting Involved in Local Elections Matters

By Brian Kaam, CVP Student Advisory Board Member from Florida Atlantic University Every year, hundreds of candidates run for political office in many different levels of government. The level of government that has the most direct impact, however, is local government. While this may seem to contradict the common belief that national elections have the greatest influence on the electorate, it is true. Let me explain: Members of Congress Have a Difficult Time Finding Common Ground, Regardless of Their Party Affiliation Members of Congress are focused on broad policies for the entire country, represent different constituencies, and often receive campaign contributions from entities that have a stake in national affairs. What is best for an urban district in South Florida may not be an adequate proposal for a rural district in Arkansas. With different interests on the table, and different parties controlling different branches of government, it is not unusual to see gridlock. The nation’s current state of affairs as it pertains to partisan control of government depicts this reality. While there is currently a unified government, we have not seen any major legislation passed. There may be a multitude of reasons why this is the case, but I am certain competing constituencies and lack of consensus are two of them. In local elections, candidates also have different constituencies, but achieving consensus on legislation is easier among 5-7 city commissioners than it is among 435 members of Congress. Representatives of smaller jurisdictions tend to know the issues affecting their respective communities, and input from constituents is more likely to be heeded. Depending on the type of legislation being passed,...