CVP is hiring a Pennsylvania Coordinator

Description Campus Vote Project (CVP) was launched in 2012 by the Fair Elections Center to expand our work on student voting issues. We work with universities, community colleges, faculty, students, and election officials to reduce barriers to student voting. CVP helps campuses institutionalize reforms that empower students with the information they need to register and vote. Position Description Campus Vote Project seeks a State Coordinator for Pennsylvania. The State Coordinator is a key member of our team. They are charged with managing and strengthening existing relationships with campus administration and faculty leadership and establishing new, lasting relationships with campuses to carry out our goals (stated below). They also supervise “Democracy Fellows”, student positions committed to carrying out democratic engagement programs on their campuses. Democracy Fellows coordinate with administration and faculty, helping organize student voter registration, voter education, and voter turnout activities. Goals of the Program: Engage campuses at an institutional level to help create nonpartisan civic engagement programs in 2018 that promote voter registration, voter education, voter turnout, and foster student leadership across the entire campus community. Provide campus administrators, faculty, and student leadership with accurate nonpartisan information on the voting process and elections through trainings, materials, and one-on-one support. Ensure campus administrators, faculty, and student leadership conduct comprehensive voter engagement programs and begin institutionalizing and cultivating a long-term culture of democratic engagement on their campuses. Implement CVP’s program with approximately 12 campus partners and 20 Democracy Fellows across Pennsylvania. Coordinate with CVP’s coalition partners also conducting nonpartisan civic engagement programs on campuses. Engage with coalition partners, make CVP materials and resources available to partners, and foster greater administrator/institutional-level engagement of...

What is CVP listening to?

It’s finally summer, and you know what that means? It means more outdoor time, long hikes (watch out for ticks), laying at the beach, enjoying the AC indoors, and the perfect time to catch up on what’s happening with democracy in our country. To help you out, we compiled some podcasts focused on voting rights, civil rights, student activism, gerrymandering, and other issues around voting. Enjoy the summer and stay engaged! An interview with John Lewis, On Being with Krista Tippet Commonly known for his slogan of “good trouble,” Representative John Lewis was a student activist for the Congress of Racial Equality (CORE) and president of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC) until he lost his re-election to Stokely Carmichael (Kwame Ture). In this interview, Rep. Lewis is interviewed on his faith and its relationship to the role he played in the Civil Rights movement. He talks about the studying and practice he and his fellow students undertook for his student activism, with the overarching theme of love and peaceful nonviolence. Quote from the Podcast: “I would say it to the young people and others sometime, ‘Don’t get in a hurry. Our struggle is not a struggle that lasts for one day, one week, one month, or one year, or one lifetime. It is an ongoing struggle.’” Voting Rights in the Courts, Constitution Daily Constitution Daily is a nonpartisan group designated by Congress to disseminate information about the Constitution. In this episode, they feature two experts from both the Heritage Foundation and Brennan Center for Justice on recent voter-related issues. They discussed various court rulings such as Shelby County...

Inspire U.S.: The Power of the Youth

The following post is by Ambika Verma a biology major at the University of California, Los Angeles. She serves on the Nevada Secretary of State’s Committee on Participatory Democracy where she suggests and implements improvements in the state’s voting system, is active in her student government on campus, and has, in the past, worked closely with the nonprofit Inspire U.S. to register students to vote at her high school and attend community events with local officials.  Government is the people’s servant; it is for the people and by the people. The cornerstone of our enduring democracy is civic virtue, yet in recent years we have seen a stark fall in civic efficacy. Everyone, regardless of age, creed, or background owns a stake in the public policies legislated by their local, state, and federal governments. Unfortunately, millennials, despite composing a large part of the electorate, continue to have the lowest voter turnout of any age group. As the future of our nation, millennials have the largest stake in our government. That is why in high school, I got involved in Inspire Nevada, a nonprofit, nonpartisan organization under Inspire U.S. Inspire U.S. is based on the concept of peer-to-peer voter registration and aims to empower students to drive positive change in their communities by using their voices. As a part of Inspire Nevada and Inspire U.S., I received opportunities to not only register more than 75% of my senior class, but also to engage with community leaders, research legislation and lobby, and give workshops on civil discourse and civic engagement to my peers. Each year, we would have an annual multi-day forum where...

Stand Up for Student Voting Rights in Florida

The following post is by Anna Baringer from Gainesville, Florida. Anna is a student at University of Florida where she studies economics and political science. In addition to being on the Campus Vote Project Student Advisory Board, she also serves as president of a student organization called Gators for Underrepresented Voters. She helps provide nonpartisan information to students and organize voter registration drives and advocacy events. In Florida, no college campus can serve as an early voting location. Florida Statute 101.657 lists the locations permitted to host early voting locations. Despite listing locations like a “stadium, convention center… or government-owned community center,” in 2014,  Florida Secretary of State Ken Detzner declared that the University of Florida could not use our student union as an early voting location. The director of the Florida Division of Elections, Maria Matthews, later released a statement stating the student union does not qualify as a government-owned convention center because “the Reitz Union is a structure designed for, and affiliated with, a specific educational institution.” This statute interpretation has rippled to prevent any building on any Florida campus from being used as an early voting site. As a result, students at many of the state’s biggest universities, are faced with a dilemma: walk miles to the nearest polling location or wait to cast a ballot until Election Day. At the University of Florida, home to more than 50,000 students, the nearest early voting location is 2.5 miles away, about a 50-minute walk. At the University of Central Florida, a school of almost 70,000, the nearest early voting site is 3 miles away, about an hour’s...