MICHIGAN

VOTING GUIDE

Including Student Information

+ Print

+ Registration Deadlines and Election Dates

  • Voter Registration Deadline: Received or postmarked by the 30th day before Election Day
  • Primary Election Registration Deadline: July 9, 2018
  • Primary Election: August 7, 2018
  • General Election Registration Deadline: October 9, 2018
  • General Election: November 6, 2018

+ Official Election Websites

+ Register at School or Home

Students have a choice about where to register to vote.
Students attending college may register at their campus address or choose to remain registered or register at their permanent or home address.
You may only be registered and vote in one location.

+ What Type of ID Do I Need to Register?

Michigan’s voter registration form asks for your Michigan driver’s license or ID number, or the last four digits of your Social Security Number. Be sure to provide one of these numbers if you have it.

+ What Type of ID Do I Need to Vote?

Election workers will ask you for a photo ID, but if you do not have one, you will sign an affidavit that you do not have ID or don’t have it on you and vote a ballot that will be counted on Election Day. Bring your photo ID if you have it because it will make the process faster. Acceptable IDs include:

  • a driver’s license or identification card issued by Michigan or another state,
  • a U.S. passport,
  • a photo ID issued by a federal or state government,
  • a military ID with photo,
  • a high school or college photo ID, or
  • a tribal ID with photo.

+ Where Do I Vote?

Make a plan. Look up your voting site and hours at: www.michigan.gov/vote

+ How Can I Vote?

By Mail or Early In-Person

  • If you registered to vote in Michigan by mail or registration drive and have not previously voted in the state, you must vote in person on Election Day (or cast an absentee ballot in person at a municipal clerk’s office). If you registered in person at a municipal clerk’s office or Secretary of State’s office, you can vote absentee. Michigan only allows exceptions for this rule for active duty military, voters over age 60, or voters suffering from a disability. First-time voters only complete an “in-person” registration (permitting them to vote absentee) if they register with the municipal clerk’s office for the municipality embracing their residential address or if they register at the Secretary of State’s office.
  • Michigan residents may apply for an absentee ballot if they have a valid reason including: expecting to be out of town on Election Day, being at least 60 years old, being unable to vote without assistance at the polls, being in jail awaiting arraignment or trial, religious reasons, or serving as an election inspector in a precinct outside of your own.
  • Request forms for absentee ballots must be received in writing by your local election official by 2 p.m. the Saturday before Election Day.
  • Completed ballots must be returned to the municipal clerk’s office before 8 p.m. on Election Day.
  • A voter may request and cast an absentee ballot at a municipal clerk’s office up until the day before Election Day. Since it occurs in person, first-time voters may take advantage of this, even if they did not register in person.

Election Day

  • Voting sites will be open from 7 a.m. to 8 p.m. on Election Day. If you are in line by the closing time then you will be allowed to vote.

+ Common Questions/Concerns

Registering to Vote Does Not Affect Your:

  • Federal Financial Aid
    • Where you register to vote will not affect federal financial aid such as Pell Grants, Perkins or Stafford loans, or your dependency status for FAFSA
  • Status as a Dependent on Your Parents’ Taxes
    • Being registered to vote at a different address from your parents does not prevent them from claiming you as a dependent on their taxes
  • Tuition Status
    • Being deemed out-of-state for tuition purposes does not prevent you from choosing to register to vote in your campus community

Will registering to vote in Michigan affect my driver’s license or car registration? 

  • No.

Fair Elections Center and Campus Vote Project intend the information contained herein is used only as a general guide. This document should not be used as a substitute for consultation with a licensed Michigan legal professional.

Last updated March 2018